Wardrobe Architect Result

Picture the scene, you’re relaxing after dinner with a glass of something yummy & Husband announces we’ve got a wedding invitation from an ex-collegue of his.  First thought – “Oh heck, what on earth an I going to wear??”  Second thought, “How much time do I have?”  It turned out I had about 2 months, the two months that were to be taken up with Indie Pattern makes!

I had a wild plan to make something fabulous in a 50s style, something nipped and flared nudged at the edge of my brain.  Then I got real.  I’d never feel comfortable in a Fifties dress, no matter how beautiful it was, and I’d never – ever wear it again!  I’m not into having things in my wardrobe that only have one use.

Silk!

Silk!

I turned instead to my Wardrobe Architect board on Pinterest and came up with a plan.  I had initially planned to wear black – I know, it’s a wedding, not a funeral!  But I’m comfortable in black.  But I’d have had to buy all the fabrics for whatever I wanted and I really, really didn’t want to do that.  Digging through the piles of fabric on the sewing table I unburied the navy & ecru spot silk chiffon Husband had bought for me back in January.  I’d planned a cowl drape top with that.  I also had a piece of navy silk charmeuse in my silk box, just right for a camisole.  So I had a top and something to counter the sheerness of the silk – all I needed was something on the bottom.

Instead of inviting fate to mess with me too much I decided to play safe & make one of my tried & tested Burdastyle trouser patterns (102 from 07/09), I just needed the fabric.  I found a beautiful stretch cotton sateen in navy on Fabric Godmother and that was that!  The trousers were made as soon as the fabric was washed & dried.  Done!  And in plenty of time, I was not going to be rushing & still sewing 30 minutes before we had to leave!  I used a remnant of the Liberty cotton from the Carme for the pockets & to trip the lower edge of the waistband.

Trouser details

Trouser details – I changed the button to a plain blue one, this one could be seen through the silk!

Then the Indie stuff hit the big time & I lost sense of time completely.  Only once all the madness was over I settled to making the cami.   I used an out of print Butterick 5487 .  The pattern calls for it to be double layered but I didn’t have enough silk for that, so I cut one layer & loads of bias strips for the upper edges.  I used French seams for the inners & double turned a narrow hem.

DSC09715-1The top was always going to be self-drafted.  It took a couple of attempts to get the right amount of drape in the front.  The first time I didn’t open up too much & kept the waist darts in.  This looked fine, but I wanted more drape & no darts.  Trying again there was too much drape and the top was too baggy in front.  Third time lucky I was happy with everything.  The back is cut on the straight with darts for shaping, 3/4 length sleeves are simple & narrow and the front is dartless.  The toile was more fitted than the silk turned out to be.  Again, I used French seams throughout & double turned the hems.

DSC09718-1I had of course, left it to the 2nd last day to begin all this.  Why?  ‘Cause I get distracted with other things!  Instead of getting on with the blouse I made two vintage dresses.  Neither were desperately needed.  But I liked the patterns & the fabric & wanted to make them.  So I did.  The net result is that yes, I was still sewing 30 minutes before we were due to leave!!  I’ll never learn it seems.

DSC09712-1But I was happy with my outfit.  I’d have prefered the blouse to be more fitted and can always add darts to the front again, but the biggest let down were the trousers!  I’ve made this pattern so many times I’ve lost count, and there’s nothing wrong with that.  I decided to make them 4 weeks ahead of schedule – and then went on a little healthy eating plan!  NOOOO!  They were too big, and of course I only realised that when I put the whole lot on to go out!  BOTHER!  Now I need to add belt loops.

The end result is positive, I have a fab new blouse I can wear anytime and it looks even better with my pale beige & camel coloured linen trousers than it does with the navy, and that navy cotton sateen is just brilliant to wear.  It’s cotton so it breathes, the satin finish makes it pretty, although it does tend to attract light-coloured fluff and the stretch content makes it all so comfortable.

DSC09713-1I’ll never be one of those in a shop-bought pretty party frock, but I will be happy in my handmade stuff.  :)

Have you made anything “out of the ordinary” for an occasion such as a wedding?

 

vintage pattern goodies for sale

Anne W:

A fabulous opportunity to get your hands on some fabulous vintage patterns!

Originally posted on Vintage Belle:

I have a confession.  I have more vintage patterns than I can currently store safely and properly!  I snapped up a large, and I mean LARGE box of vintage patterns from the fourties to the nineties a couple of weeks ago and have been slowly sifting though them all, trying to decide which are definitely to keep and which I can bear to part with.  This has been a hard job!  They are all gorgeous and special in their own way, but there is really a limit to what I can keep right now and how many coat patterns of a similar style do I realistically need to keep??

So, with that thought firmly in mind, I have identified 35 patterns, so far, that I can sell.  Here are 8.  They are in my Etsy shop with full details and costs.  If you’d prefer not to buy via Etsy, let…

View original 314 more words

Sewaholic Fan-Girl

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The final instalment of Indie Pattern Month is the Fan-Girl, Ultimate Level.  Now I don’t know about ultimate here, but I have managed to make up two Sewaholic patterns.  Initially I thought about this combination, but then after all the other competitive sewing I wondered if I really needed to enter another competition.

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I’d bought the Gabriola skirt pattern after spotting the most beautiful bird print chiffon from Croft Mill Fabric.  I had great plans for this fabric and Daughter No2 draped herself in it when it arrived!  The grey jersey for the Renfrew is from Croft Mill too, Caroline helped me greatly in chosing the right stuff, so a big thank you there!

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The Renfrew tee has been made up by me a number of times now, this will be the fourth for Daughter No2!  I cut the 6 on the shoulders, grading to a 2 at the waist and then out to a 4 at the hip.  I also had to lengthen the shoulder by 2cm.  She didn’t want the waistband part of the tee, so I ran a line of twin-needling 1cm from the raw edge and didn’t turn up a hem.  The Renfrew, as always goes together well, it took  a couple of hours on the overlocker, perfect for a quick make.

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The Gabriola however, was a completely different kettle of fish.  The print ran across the fabric, so I thought I’d cut the pattern pieces on the cross grain.  This was not one of my brightest ideas, as it turns out.  It was slippery as heck to cut and even worse to pin together.  I used French seams everywhere except to attach the skirt pieces to the yokes.  There I used a flat fell seam.

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Good for swirling in too!

Good for swirling in too!

I wasn’t sure what to do with the waistband – at first I didn’t want to make it too stiff, but I was concerned that the chiffon wouldn’t be strong enough with just a fine interfacing.  After asking for so ideas from Tashia on twitter which weren’t forthcoming, I decided to start with interfacing with the fine sheer polyester fusible.  I bought a length of white 4cm wide grossgrain ribbon and handstitched the waistband to the ribbon with a herringbone stitch.  This has worked out quite well & now I can be sure it’ll be secure enough with the button & buttonhole too.

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Obviously the skirt needed to be lined, but with what..  The more common linings wouldn’t be suitable here, I couldn’t use an acetate or cupro and silk would have been too expensive and not suitable for a teenager to wear every day.  I bought some white cotton muslin for the job, and used it for the toile too.  This I constructed using Mock French seams so that I could alter it quickly and easily if I had to.

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The cotton does alter the hang of the chiffon, the skirt would have been far more drapey with a more fluid lining, but Daughter No2 likes it as it is, and I am not unhappy with the result.  I let the skirt hang for a day to see how much dropping there would be and had a pain of a time evening up the hem!  In some places 6-7cm had to come off, and in others it was fine.  I did away with the 2.5cm hem idea too, just using the rolled hem foot, but hemming the lining properly.

Window shopping

Window shopping

Daughter no2 loves the skirt, it’s so pretty and feminine and she cannot wait to wear it out & show it off to her friends!  I love how it looks with her biker jacket and the grey for the teeshirt has worked so much better than the predictable blue would have.

Jump! :)

Jump! :)

 *** UPDATE ***

Voting is now open and will close on Friday 5 July at midnight UCT.  Click on the button below to go to the voting page where you’ll find all the entries.

Can you put an invisible zip into a French seamed seam? Of course you can!

This was a question posed on twitter last week, and I replied yes, you can, but it’s hard to convey just how to get it done well in 140 characters.  So while I was making up a Gabriola for Daughter No2 in chiffon, I thought I’d photograph the process of inserting the invisible zip with a French seam.  Strapped in?  Here goes!

First of all, stabilise and support the fabric to carry the zip.  If you’re using a French seam in your fabric, chances are it’s fine, soft and not very strong.  I used a 3cm wide strip of a fine sheer polyester fusible.  You can buy the same interfacings that I use from Gill Arnold via the post.  Then sew in the zip as you usually would.  Once it’s in, the fun can begin.

Stabilise the area behind the zip & insert as normal.

Stabilise the area behind the zip & insert as normal.

Snip the seam to the zip stop mark or the base of the zip stitching.  Make sure you do not snip past the limit of the seam allowance, or you’ll be in trouble later.

snip, snip, snip!

snip, snip, snip!

Now you can align the seam edges together, with wrong sides together and sew the first part of the French seam, from the hem up to the snip.  Trim that 1cm seam down to just under 5mm, neatly.  Press to one side and turn the fabric over to enclose the raw edges and sew the remaining 5mm of the French seam.  Work from the hem up to the zip stop and sew as far as you can with the machine.

Sew the French seam from the hem up to the zip

Sew the French seam from the hem up to the zip

The last part of the French seam needs to come as close to the zip stitching as possible, without distorting the seam.  You will probably have a gap of at least 5mm.  This isn’t a problem, you’ll stitch that shut from the outside by hand.

Finishing off the seam & zip

Finishing off the seam & zip

I use a ladder stitch to close the hole, going up and down the ladder a couple of times to make sure the stitching is strong enough to survive Daughter No2 yanking the zip down too hard!

The finished zip & French seam from the right side.

The finished zip & French seam from the right side.

I hope that helps anyone wanting to use a French seam and invisible zip.  It’s a technique I’ve used a lot and it seems to work fairly well for me.  I’ve just about finished the skirt now, just waiting to see how much of the hem needs to be chopped to make it even.  I am hoping to be able to submit it and a Renfrew for The Monthly Stitch’s Indie Fan Girl category in Indie Pattern Month.  If I get the hem sorted in time & I’m happy with it, look out for it to vote!  :)

 

 

So much going on!!

It’s been a busy week and a bit.  There’s been a lot of sewing and cutting and a little bit of hair pulling thrown in for good measure!  The highlight of this week is definitely the news that I won the Sewing Indie Month’s Dressed to the Nines category!  How excited was I when I got that email?!?!?

I was sooo chuffed, so I have to say a very large thank you to all those who voted for me, and for Daughter No2’s pretty butterfly dress.  There were some fantastic entries from all over the world so it is a huge honour to have been chosen as people’s favourite out of all of them.  A massive thank you also has to go to Mari from Seamster Patterns for organising the whole party and keeping a careful eye over the proceedings.  The sponsors have been superb too, there are so many loverly prizes!!  I had thought of possibly passing a few on, spreading the love, you know.  But first I need to check that that would be allowed.

Over the weekend I also found out I’d won a prize in The Monthly Stitch’s New to Me competition.  That’s where the Carme in Liberty had been submitted, so that’s even more patterns for me! :)  So I definitely need to pass on a few, this community is so great I couldn’t keep all these goodies completely to myself.  So stay tuned, there might be something going on in the next week or so.

In the mean time, this is just a little bit of what I’ve been sewing up.  Last week I finally got my butt into gear and cut out the Gabriola from Sewaholic patterns.  I had initially thought to enter the Fan Girl section of The Monthly Stich’s Independent Pattern Month, then I thought I’d probably done enough for competitions lately!  But over the weekend Daughter No2 persuaded me to go for it, after all, I was going to be making it anyway.  The fabric is a pretty bird print chiffon from Croft Mill Fabric.

It was a devil to cut!  Loads of pins were required for cutting and even more for sewing!  Normally I don’t have an issue with chiffon, you take your time, breathe deeply and pin like mad.  This stuff needs GLUE!!  Anyway, things are progressing.  To go with the skirt I’m going to make the Renfrew tee.  Thank you so very much to Caroline from Croft Mill Fabric for finding me the right colour jersey to go with that bird print, and for getting it off in the post after I’d left it to the last minute to decide to have it!  :)  I love good customer service!!

Gabriola in progress

Gabriola in progress

I have also made progress on my outfit for a wedding Husband and I will be attending in July.  I will go into more detail in a later post, but I’ve done the trousers in a navy cotton sateen from Fabric Godmother, it’s so beautiful!!  I lined the pockets with left overs of the Liberty used for Daughter No2’s Carme, little details!!

Goodies for wedding outfit

Goodies for wedding outfit

The spotty stuff is a slik chiffon that will become the blouse/top.  That’s it for now, I need to get cracking with stuff today.  In the mean time, here’s a look at the internal goings on in the Paris Snowball, as requested.  :)

Overlocked seams and bound hem, the inner workings of the Paris Snowball

Overlocked seams and bound hem, the inner workings of the Paris Snowball

 

Orange French Knot Skirt

 Simplicity 6896, view C

Simplicity 6896, view C

After the reaction the orange skirt Daughter No2 wore with her wearable toile Carme, I decided I’d better give more info on the skirt she had on too!  It was made in July 2012, so it’s had its fair share of outings already, but it was never blogged.  I had used Simplicity 6896, view C.  I liked the box pleats and the wide belt loops.

The fabric had been a plain white linen that I’d dyed this fabulous orange the year before.  It had been a long piece of fabric, I cut it in half and dyed half Dylon Sunflower Yellow & this was Dylon Goldfish Orange.  I had no idea what I was going to do with it, but once in the stash it was ready when I was!  I then saw an a-line skirt in a friend’s Boden catalogue, the online details are no longer available, but here’s an image someone has pinned to Pinterest.

French knot skirt by Boden, about 2011 or 2012

It was linen and had been embellished with rows of equally spaced French knots in a contrasting colour.  At the time I’d been making French knot sheep on pincushions and cushion covers and totebags, so a few more French knots on a skirt weren’t going to lose me any sleep!  I found enough turquoise embroidery thread in my stash & bought a turquoise invisible zip too.

Three rows of spaced French knots

Three rows of spaced French knots

I made the skirt up first, then measured the width and divided that number into equal parts.  I marked the position of the knots with a disappearing marker and got cracking.  The result is really eye-catching, and it cost me a fraction of the Boden skirt!  Yay for DIY fashion!

The details

The details: (clockwise from top left) French knots on the outside, turquoise zip, the back of the knots & the inner waistband.

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Just such a simple embellishment changes it from a normal skirt to something a little special.  If you’d like to do something similar, here’s a French knot tutorial.  I hope you’ve enjoyed our little journey into the past with this make, now I have to get on with a pair of trousers.  I have a wedding reception to attend next month, and would you know it – I haven’t a thing to wear…

Oh – don’t forget to vote for my competition entries:  The Monthly Stitch has the Carme in Liberty & the Dressed to the Nines is being re-run, my entry there is A Snowball for the Summer.  Thanks!  :)

The Carme – New to Me

I feel like I’ve been sewing non stop lately.  Last week I completed four projects, started and completed, might I add.  So over the weekend I had time off.  And Monday.  And Tuesday too.  Then I remembered I had cut the toile for Pauline Alice‘s Carme Blouse in order to enter it into The Monthly Stitch Independent Pattern Month competition for independent designers new to you (me).  I’d bought the pattern initially for another competition intended to promote independent pattern designers, Sewing Indie Month, but ran out of time.  With Wednesday knocking on my door I really didn’t want to run out of time again!

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So I got cracking with the toile which I thought Daughter No2 might be able to wear if it all worked out ok.  I grabbed a navy gingham with a teeny tiny check from the stash & got clever cutting the front placket,tabs, cuffs and collars on the bias.  I interfaced the cuffs and collar on the straight so they didn’t stretch out of shape, but still kept the interest in the print.  I tried out a flat fell seam which looked good, just tricky in the sleeve which in Daughter No2’s size are a little narrow to do a really good job.  By the afternoon things were going well, the iPod was on a good volume pumping out some great tracks, then I realised I’d made a boob.  I sewed the front placket very carefully right sides together.  (It’s supposed to be wrong sides up…)  Of course I’d cut it before noticing.  So the placket looks fabulous – on the inside..  Oh dear.  Anyway, I finished it off that evening.

orange & blue

Carme Blouse wearable toile with orange handmade linen skirt, embellished with French knots

In the morning Daughter No2 dutifully posed for me, and then wore it out – in public!  I guess no-one has noticed my obvious mistake – yet!  From the toile I knew I had to widen the shoulders by 1.5cm, which is an adjustment often needed for her shoulders, and lengthen the sleeves by 2cm.  I also needed to lower the neckline about 2-3cm if she ever wanted to button the blouse up to the top.  Luckily for me she decided no buttons were necessary at all, therefore we haven’t adjusted the neckline. Her measurements had landed smack in between the two smaller sizes so I’d opted for the larger, just in case.  The rest of the garment was fine, so I prepared to cut my proper fabric.

Can you spot my big mistake?

Can you spot my big mistake?

We’d chosen a piece of Liberty lawn from the stash, must have had it around 4 or 5 years, so it was time to use it up.  I fiddled around with the pattern, trying to get a good placement on the pieces, when I realised something wasn’t quite right. The print was off grain!!  NOOOO!  It was kinda liberating, I just thought, sod it, and cut where I wanted instead!  :)

Wheat & white spot cotton bias binding edging the tucked bib.

Wheat & white spot cotton bias binding edging the tucked bib.

In order to add a little pizzaz I picked a wheat coloured spot cotton bias from the stash of trims.  I thought I could use it in some intersecting areas.  To go with the bias we picked out warm coloured buttons and contrast thread, with the idea to use that for topstitching.  After a test, I discarded the contrast topstitching idea and stuck to an off white for that job.  I also ditched the idea of using the flat fell seam and stuck to French seams.  Guaranteed good finish.

Carme Details

Carme Details

The wheat spot bias ended up decorating the curved edges of the tucked bib and trimming the cuffs.  The cotton was a little too stiff to work properly at the neck edge.  This means I have more left over than I’d expected so I can use it somewhere else now too! :)  I love the contrast of the blue Liberty print and the warm bias binding.  It draws the eye, so I had to be sure my stitching was dead straight.

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I really like this pattern, it’s fairly quick to make, and I only altered two things from the original pattern instructions.  One was to attach the collar differently.  It’s always easier to get a collar onto something if you can make it flat, so no side seams until the collar is done.  Then I changed the way the cuffs were attached.  The instructions have you gather the lower edge of the sleeve, sew the cuffs short ends together and then turn under the seam allowances on the long edge in order to sandwich over the gathered sleeve.  I just couldn’t see that working neatly on the toile already, and knew that with the addition of the bias that it would have to be different.  I attached the cuff the way you’d sew on a waistband.

Fold the cuff in half, wrong sides together & press.  Turn under the seam allowance on one long side.  Leaving seam allowances on the short side overlapping the sleeve, sew the other long side to the sleeve edge, right sides together.  Fold the cuff at the pressed fold, lining up the turned seam allowance and stitch the short edges together.  Layer & trim & turn.  Et voila.

Tuck detail & bias trim on cuffs

Tuck detail & bias trim on cuffs

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I made the blouse over two days in the garden.  We’ve been enjoing some lovely weather here in the UK this week, and it was far too nice to sit indoors when all the action was outside.  The only problem was the distraction.  The antics of the various birds in the garden was so funny, I’d sew a bit, then sit back & watch the birds, then sew a bit again.  We have a very territorial blackbird who has decided to attack every dove & wood pigeon who dares invade his airspace. Luckily he’s not bothered by the robins or the little tits.  He could bully the starlings a little more though, they’re eating me out of house & home!  :)  Do you ever think of moving into the garden with your machine?  Would it even be practical for you?

Sewing in the garden

Sewing in the garden

Will there be more Carme Blouses on my sewing table?  Undoubtedly.  Daughter No2 really likes it, the shape, length, hem curve and of course, the tab to hold up the sleeves to look extra cool!

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I’m submitting this blouse for the New to Me category of the competition, and when the voting opens would be very grateful if you’d consider voting for me.  Thank you to all those who voted for my Snowball in Paris dress (which I have just found out I won a prize for!!), and for A Summer Snowball in the other two competitions, and also for all the lovely comments.

ipm new to me

 UPDATE

Voting is now open for New To Me, please pop over to The Monthly Stitch & vote!  The entry is called “Carme in Liberty” on that page.

A Snowball in Paris

Waffle Patterns' Snowball dress

Waffle Patterns’ Snowball dress

I am in love with this pattern – officially!  The submissions for Sewing Indie Month for May ended on the 4th June, and only 1 Snowball had been submitted, my Summer Butterfly one.  I’m really surprised, this is a great pattern.  If you’d thought about it & then decided not to buy it, let me change your mind again.

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It has a great shape.  That curved, high waistline gives great definition, helped by the fabulous seams that curve from the neck down.  They line up with the skirt seams which flare out at the hem.  The silhouette is just gorgeous.  You could wear this to a slap-up dinner and never feel the need to open the button on your trousers or skirt!  :)

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The zip in the centre back seam goes in effortlessly using Yuki’s instructions.  The neckline and armholes are faced all in one & sewn together rather like the way you’d construct a waistcoat, so there are no loose ends and floppy bits.  This adds structure to the top of the bodice, all of which helps to hold that fabulous shape.

DSC08738-1As a dress to wear in the office in a lightweight wool, or out to dinner in something glamourous, the Snowball is a great choice.  It has just enough 60s flare to be a bit retro-chic & plenty of modern styling to make it thoroughly contemporary.

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Have I done enough yet?  Are you tempted?  This version used the remnants of the printed cotton canvas I used for Le Bellatrix Blazer français.  There really wasn’t much left, and I struggled to get all the bodice pieces and the facings out.  Unfortunately I just couldn’t get great pattern placement with the Eiffel Tower, so this bodice has lots of lables and crowns instead!  The cotton canvas is definitely not as structured as the cotton twill used for the Summer Snowball.  It’s softer and moves better, but is still perfectly suited to keeping the shape of the bodice.  The facings were interfaced with a fine sheer polyester fusible from Gill Arnold, no so heavyweight intervention there either.

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The skirt used a slightly charcoal-black linen from my stash.  I thought it would work better with the print, not being heavily black.  It was a little lightweight, however and let too much light in!  So I lined the skirt with some black cotton lawn, also from the stash.  The hem is bound with black bias binding & I hand stitched it in place using herringbone stitch.  The lining’s hem was double turned & machine stitched.  I also overlocked everything.  No bound skirt seams this time!  Whilst I do love that finish, it takes an awfully long time and lots of time was something I did not have this week.

Serious model pose...

Serious model pose…

I added the same 3cm to the bottom of the skirt as I had done for the Summer Snowball, cutting the lining the normal length so it didn’t stick out.  After completing the Summer Snowball & seeing it on Daughter No2 properly, I decided I probably should have made it a little smaller in the waist area.  So with this version I switched to the 34 from about mid-way down the bodice and continuing into the skirt.  As you can see, it now has a much more fitting shape, one Daughter No2 prefers.  I guess that means I’ll be taking Summer Snowball apart a little so it can be taken in.  It will be worth it though.  She goes back to school next week for about a month now that her exams from Lower 6th are finished and she definitely wants to show off her new dresses!

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So what do you think?  Are you up for trying it out?  Just to say, I am not being paid to push this pattern!  I just love it & really want to see other versions online!  Go on, give it a go!  :)

dresses competition

One more thing – I’m entering this dress in The Monthly Stitch’s Indie Pattern Month Dresses Week competition (phew, that’s a bit of a mouthful!) & I’d really appreciate it if you would vote for me!  :)

 

Pattern Testing – The Kyoto Kimono

Kyoto Kimono by Elise Patterns

Kyoto Kimono by Elise Patterns

I was a very busy sewist last month, I volunteered to be a pattern tester for 3 indie pattern companies, and I got the most amazing stuff to test!  This kimono is by a brand new company, Elise Patterns.  Elise Patterns is owned by Freya from Handmade by Freya.  She has set out to create pretty lingerie patterns that are uncomplicated to make, and fabulous to wear!  Her first two patterns are available now, and this is one of them.

DSC08543-1The jacket, or robe, is available in two lengths, this short version and a more lingerie type mid-thigh length.  There are also two sleeve choices.  I decided to go with the shorter version, knowing Daughter No2 would probably want it more for day wear than lingerie!  I ferreted around in my stash until I found this pretty cotton floral lawn.  I’ve had it for ages, but once I saw the line drawings of Freya’s pattern, I pictured it in this with contrast bands.  They’re cut from some black cotton lawn, also from the stash.

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The pattern itself is really easy to follow and make.  I would certainly recommend it to anyone from beginner level up.  I chose to French seam the inners, and the contrast bands have had their seams all tucked away too, so when this flips open in the breeze, it’s just as pretty on the inside as on the out.

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Daughter No2 loves it – she wore it out to a friend’s barbeque the day I made it (see photo above) with her chopped off jeans and came home with orders!!!  Ha!  This selfish seamstress isn’t about to do that, but now the pattern is available, I shall be sending her mates to the website & including a note to come to one of my sewing classes to make it up!  She has decided it is perfect for festival wear and I know it has pride of honour at the top of her list of things to pack for the Reading & Leeds Festival later this summer.

DSC08540-1It really is a great pattern, there are only two main pieces, the front & back, and the band strips.  If you were to make it for lingerie, consider cutting the sleeve bands on the bias and then finishing with a scalloped edge using a fancy stitch on your sewing machine.  There are so many ways you could customise this kimono, I think the varieties could look amazing!

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I’m looking forward to seeing this pattern pop up all over Blogland, it has great potential!

 

 

Kaleidoscope

The Honeydew Skirt by Seamster Patterns

The Honeydew Skirt by Seamster Patterns

I have finally found a use for this fabric!  This was what I thought I could use for the Snowball, but the pattern repeat was just too big.  I had just about 2m, but in two separate pieces!  The fabric was not symmetrical down the centre, so to get anything that lined up I had to move the fold so that 30cm was a single layer.  This meant lining patterns and finding suitable patterns was a bit tricky.

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Thank goodness this skirt pattern doesn’t have big pieces to lay on the fabric.  I sort of decided not to line up the pattern properly, I couldn’t have, even if I’d tried, so I tried to make the best of it by picking areas to stand out.

honeydew take 2

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The fabric is a printed cotton canvas that has a pretty good drape, no stiffness and hangs rather well.  I decided as it was to be a quick make to overlock as much of the skirt as I could.  I also kept the same size and waistband options as the test pattern Daughter No1 made for herself.  As she had a problem with the length, I figured that Daughter No2’s shape and the insertion of a zip in the side would keep the skirt sitting higher and therefore make it shorter.  Actually, it’s quite interesting to see the difference in where the waistband sits on this skirt compared to Daughter No1’s make.

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Funnily enough, it doesn’t seem to be that much shorter – but it is a length Daughter No2 is perfectly happy to wear.  She likes swirling in it too!  The zip in the left side seam meant I sacrificed a pocket.  One will do though, it’s one better than none!  I can see this skirt being worn loads, both as a properly casual weekend item, and to school with a neat jackets & heels.

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This is my second entry for Sewing Indie Month, this time an entry for the Everyday Casual category.  Thank you so much to everyone who commented on the Snowball dress, I’ve been pretty blown away by the love for that dress – and the fabric! :)  There have been quite a few HBL Anna dresses submitted in the Dress to the Nines category, so I hope my Summer Snowball doesn’t get lost in the crowd!  I’ve enjoyed browsing all the entries for the overall contest, so many new blogs to read!

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